WRITERS, LIES, AND FILTHY LUCRE

money

Lately writers have been talking about a piece by Ann Bauer in Salon. Entitled “Sponsored by My Husband,” the essay reveals that Bauer’s writing career is subsidized by her husband’s comfortable salary. “All that disclosure is crass,” she writes. “I’m sorry. Because in this world, where women will sit around discussing the various topiary shapes of their bikini waxes, the conversation about money (or privilege) is the one we never have.”

breaking_upWe don’t? Over the course of my career in writing and publishing, and as a frequent presenter at writers’ conferences, I’ve met countless published writers; and I’ve yet to take part in a conversation that didn’t devolve within seconds to talk of money. It’s an obsession, probably because there’s so little of it to be had in the profession. If you see a few professional writers at a table with their heads together, I guarantee you they’re not talking about the use of metaphor in modern fiction or the latest linguistics theory. They’re dishing about advances, royalty rates, and the monetization of backlists.

Of course, that’s talking writer to writer. When it comes to public speaking, writers have a different agenda. They talk about art and transformation, hard work allied with inspiration.  Bauer attributes this to their desire to present an Olympian image: the Celebrated Author descending from on high to disperse wit and wisdom to the adoring throngs (or semi-throngs; the usual book event draws an average of 8 to 12 attendees, half of them related to the author.)

slushThere are more generous explanations; but even if Bauer’s is right, should we begrudge writers their little affectations? I don’t think so. In real life, most writers are working stiffs with mortgages, kids, and too little money. Once in a while, though, we get to dress up and play rock stars; and what’s the harm in that? Consider the writer’s life. For years at a time, she leads a cloistered existence, laboring in isolation without feedback, encouragement, or paycheck. Then her book is published, and there is a great flurry of activity. The writer takes off her sweats, dons her official writer clothes,  and emerges blinking from her cave to toasts and accolades. It would take a hard heart to deny her a bit of basking and a glass or two of champagne before shutting her up again.

But writers should tell the truth, insists Bauer, though I’m not sure why; no one else does.  “We do an enormous ‘let them eat cake’ disservice to our community,” she writes, “when we obfuscate the circumstances that help us write, publish and in some way succeed.”

Depends, say I. Sometimes a little obfuscation can be a good thing. As a fiction writer, I have, admittedly, an ambiguous relationship to the truth; that is, I think it takes many forms beyond the literal. But in this case, my objection to excessive truth-telling is practical. If authors were to use public appearances to complain about how poorly they are paid (which is absolutely true), how would audiences react? They’d still see the author as privileged, only now they see him as privileged and whiny. Every profession has its drawbacks. Very few writers would swap theirs for, say, coal mining or sausage making. Personally, I’d rather use those rare public outings to shine a light on my work than on the conditions under which it’s produced.

I’m all for honesty and openness, in their place. This blog’s mission is to provide just that sort of honest, down-to-earth guidance to other writers, both published and aspiring. I believe writers need to share information and experience in order to plot our path through the rapidly changing publishing ecosphere.

But don’t cork up that champagne just yet! If we can’t have riches, we can at least have fun. One of the characters in my last book, A DANGEROUS FICTION, makes an appearance at her book launch dressed as Cleopatra, borne on a litter by four strapping young men in togas. Ms. Bauer might think this over the top. To me, it seems about right.

woman in litter

 

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A Talk with J.A. Jance

We met under the happiest of circumstance. The celebrated  J. A. Jance had read A DANGEROUS FICTION and enjoyed it enough to agree for the first time in many years to write a blurb. I wrote to thank her, and a pleasant exchange followed. We stayed in touch. Recently we had an email exchange in which Judith shared some very important lessons about making one’s living as a writer: building a brand, as it’s called these days. I found it extraordinarily useful and relevant; I think any writer, published, self-published or hybrid, can learn a lot from it. With her kind permission, I am sharing that conversation with you below.

J. A. Jance had mentioned in a previous email that she was embarking on a book tour.

“Book tour?” I answered wistfully. “Do publishers still do that?” The Penguin paperback edition of A DANGEROUS FICTION had just come out, and with the help of a kind and diligent Penguin publicist, I’d been doing some modest online promotion, but nothing strenuous, mostly from the comfort of my office.

Jance “Yes,”  J. A. Jance replied, “three weeks on the road.  This morning I’m home, sitting on my own back porch in the Seattle area and trying to keep the damned heron from poaching my goldfish.

I cut my teeth in the lowly world of “original paperbacks” where mysteries supposedly had a 90 day shelf-life.  I’m happy to report that my first novel, Until Proven Guilty, is still in print 29 years later!!!  The guys, local old hands at writing and all of them male, took me to the woodshed and  told me to jump ship with Avon and go with someone who would pay me some “real” money.  Fortunately, I disregarded that advice and stayed put.  As for them?  They’ve all lost their early books through . . . well . . . jumping ship.

When that first book was due to come out, I was so elated.  Remember, I hail from humble pie Bisbee, Arizona.  I was being published by a NY publisher.  When I called my editor and asked when the book publishing party would be, he nearly choked on his coffee.  Party?  What party???  So we threw a party ourselves, and my agent–my agent then and my agent now–my sister and I, a grand opening party complete with a visiting llama who peed in the elevator on his way up to the party room.  (The building manager was NOT happy!)

My inquiries about a tour were met with similar derision, so my agent–that same agent–set up 30 signings for me.  THIRTY!!  I went all over hell and gone in Washington, Oregon, and Arizona–ON MY OWN NICKEL–signing books at any B. Dalton or Waldenbooks that would give me a table and let me hawk books inside or outside the store.  Because I didn’t know how much the first two on-sale weeks mattered, I WENT ON VACATION!!! before those signings started.  In the long run, it turns out that was the right thing to do. Avon printed 30,000 copies of UPG and shipped most of them.  Then when orders for the signings started coming in, the book was OUT OF PRINT!  That caused something of a stir.  How could an original paperback from an unknown writer in Nowheresville, USA, be garnering that kind of sales?  As far as New York was  concerned, that second printing came like a bolt out of the blue!

And then the second book came out.  Back then and even now, I do two books a year.  When the second book came out, we went back to those same stores–Washington, Oregon, Arizona–and did the same thing.  Only this time, I could sell two books at the same time–the first and the second–instead of just one. That strategy worked up to and including book number four.  I write series books, and I always told new readers that of course they should start with number one.  All during that time, I was doing free (but you must have books for sale) events for libraries, civic groups–Rotary or Kiwanis anyone?–book clubs, and ladies auxiliary luncheons.  Give me an audience and let me talk to them.

My first nine books were all original paperback and was looked down on with almost the same disrespect as e-books receive now.  There was no publisher paid tour.  My husband had a sales job and,whenever possible, I went along for the ride and set up signings coming and going.  He did his job during the day and during the week and helped with the signings evenings and weekends.  He doesn’t write, but he’s my partner, and none of this would be possible without him.  By the way, our first date as the “llama peeing” grand opening party for the first book.  Now I say that “I write the books and he writes the checks” because he handles the business end of the business.

In college, I was excluded from a Creative Writing program because, as the professor told me, I was a girl.  “Girls become teachers or nurese; Boys become writers.”  That’s a direct quote by the way, engraved on my psyche and the reason a fromer professor of Creative Writing is the crazed killer in my first hardback, Hour of the Hunter.

I taught school for a few years, worked as a school librarian, and then spent ten years in the life insurance business.  For that first party, we invited everyone in my Rolodex–called them on the phone and invited them.  For the next book the grand opening party was at a local restaurant rather than in our building.  That restaurant, the Doghouse, is long gone now, but before every grand opening we called the people in the Rolodex and that became The Doghouse List.  What was once primarily a phone list has now morphed into an e-mail list with 14,411 names on it as of now.

In the last few years, the publicists in New York have done only the bare minimum as far as setting up tours.  They go to the places that are easy for them–in other words, they call the places that they have on file and book signings there without any regard about who and where my fans are based.  The note I sent to you–asking for a physical location–is one of several thousand I’ve sent out in the past few days.  Time spent waiting in airports, riding on planes, and living in no known time zone–is not creative time, but I’ve turned it into useful time by getting physical locations on literally hundreds of people for whom I previously had only e-mail addresses.  That way I’ll be able to SEND OUT ANNOUNCEMENTS INVITING THEM TO SPECIFIC EVENTS!  And that makes my list a more effective marketing tool.

After last year’s tour disaster, I took things in hand and booked the first seventeen events of this tour–local events–my own damned self!  Worked like a dog that first week, taking my show on the road and doing two to three events a day–30 minutes of Q and A before the actual starting time.  The Q and A is my warm up act.  (I’m sorry, I can’t help but roll my eyes at “Where do you get your ideas?”  Grrr!  That one drives me nuts.  Do they think I go out hunting ideas with a butterfly net?)  Then I do an hour long presentation and close with a Janis Ian song–At Seventeen most often.  The presentation is followed by a signing.  Two hours in all.  No intermission.  I don’t read at signings.  I talk at signings.  I tell about where the ideas for that book came from.  I tell about my own origins and history.  I tell stories people tell me about reading my books–most of which have come in through e-mails that I ALWAYS ANSWER MYSELF!  But the thing about doing local events?  As I learned in those early years, those numerious signings were in my neck of the woods,  but if reporting stores are doing the selling, those sales count and numbers, even regional numbers, rule.  By the way, if you’re not comfortable doing public speaking, you need to get that way fast.  I took the Dale Carnegie course first and then spent a year in Toastmasters.

All this is to say, Barbara, go out and find your own fans–in libraries or wherever.  (Ann Rule and I used to be known as the queens of drug store and grocery store openings.  If the stores wanted us, we went.)  Make sure the various venues have SOMEONE THERE TO SELL THE BOOK.  I do NOT sell books out of the back of my car at events, and neither should you.  Collect names.  Get those early readers to become loyal readers.

My first ICD sales rep, Holly Turner, who sold paperbacks to the wholesalers–back in the old days when there were LOTS of wholesalers and no Amazon–told me once, “One personal contact is worth ten readers.”  I believe that’s true.  In this digital day and age, when we send out notices in advance of books going on sale, people have come to regard those letters as personal notes from me.  They are points of contact.  After the announcements go out, I spend days responding to the replies, but those people hear from me.  They are my PEOPLE, and they make my life possible.

So here’s a whole tankful of unsolicited advice. All of which is meant to say, don’t let the turkeys get you down.  Don’t just grumble.  Do something.  Do events.  Get people in your corner.  I still encounter people who say, “I met you the first time selling books on a card table outside a Waldenbooks in wherever.”  Fifty plus books later, those people are still reading my books.  And that counts!

JAJ

REMAINS OF INNOCENCEThat’s it. I trust you’ll agree with me that J. A. Jance is a class act, not only talented but extremely hard-working and as loyal to her fans as they are to her.  I appreciate her willingness to share the lessons she’s learned along the way. She has a new book out in her Joanna Brady series, by the way, and it’s wonderful: REMAINS OF INNOCENCE.

 

 

For lots more writing and publishing interviews and advice, subscribe to this blog through the links above and to the right. And here are a few links to previous interviews:

 

Writer Diana Gabaldon

 Writer Lorraine Bartlett

 Literary agent Gail Hochman

 Viking Editor Tara Singh

 Simon & Schuster editor-in-chief Marysue Rucci

 Book publicist Brian Feinblum

Insider Tips from a Publicity Pro: Positioning Books for Success

I’m delighted to welcome to In Cold Ink Brian Feinblum of Media Connect, a major book publicity firm with a tent large enough to include Al Gore and Dick Cheney on its client list—so you know that’s got to be a huge tent. Amazon Publishing and the Penguin Group are on the list, too, along with writers as diverse as Maya Angelou and Jackie Collins. It was great to have the opportunity to pick the brains of a real publicity expert. I learned a lot from this interview; I think you will, too.

 Brian, tell me a bit about yourself and your company. What made you decide to focus on book promotion and author publicity?

Brian FeinblumI am the chief marketing officer for Media Connect , the nation’s leading book publicity firm. I have been here 15 years and the firm has helped thousands of authors over the past 50+ years. I love working with authors and helping them to grow their brand and have their voices heard. When I graduated from college 25 years ago as an English major I planned on being a journalist but ended up staying in book publishing. I like working in PR and working with the media from the other side.  I can’t see promoting too many other industries. I love books because they represent ideas and values. Books make the world go – from entertainment and literacy to recording history and sometimes creating it. I value words and the language. Other than writing scripts for the adult entertainment industry (any offers out there?), I can’t think of a better field to be in.

Once, at a publishing dinner, I heard one publisher declare that he really had no idea what sells books, while others at the table nodded agreement. Do you know? In your experience, what sort of promotion or venue moves the sales needle significantly?

There is no magic formula, but there are things that are logical and make sense. For instance, where possible, diversify your media portfolio, just as you would your finances. Don’t just work at social media and ignore the opportunities with radio, print or TV. Further, most authors/publisher need to start their campaigns on time (four months before a book’s release) and to do things prior to that, such as building a social media platform, creating a Web site, and lining up distribution. Too often, people sabotage their potential success by missing deadlines and ignoring the way the media asks that you interact with it.

Has the consolidation of retail outlets (i.e. Amazon) affected your publicity strategy, and if so, how?

No. How people buy a book doesn’t matter for the sake of getting media coverage, although I personally support printed books and physical bookstores because they bring about a richer reading experience and develop a community. More important than who sells books is who publishes them. The consolidating of major publishers into just five owners poses a threat in terms of the diversity of voices being published and the lack of competition for authors looking to sell their books to a publisher.

Effective publicity services don’t come cheap. Are they a good investment for all writers? If not, what sort of writer should consider hiring a publicity firm?

homeless manFirst, don’t mortgage your house just because you believe in your book. They say don’t gamble money you can’t afford to lose, when it comes to casinos or investing.  Same with book publicity. But you do need to spend some money, take some risks, and be willing to support your financial commitment by also dedicating your time to the process. No matter how much is being spent it needs to be well spent, meaning an author should have a plan customized to meet his or her needs, desires and goals – and it should be a plan that a publicist believes will be successful. For instance, I would recommend online media and radio to novelists but would never, ever recommend pursuing national TV unless it was an unusual circumstance.

I realize there are many levels of service available from a company like yours, so this is not a simple question, but I’ll ask it anyway. What should writers expect to pay for publicity campaigns? A range is fine.

Authors should be ready to pay between $3000 – $5000 per month for a PR campaign, one that lasts 3 -6 months, BUT one can’t buy PR like a commodity. What one publicist does for the same amount of money another charges may not be apples to apples, either in the scope of the campaign or the results. I like to target a campaign that makes sense for an author, rather than ask the author to simply pay a set fee for services that aren’t relevant to that particular author.

Given that most writers have limited budgets and could not afford professional representation on a long-term basis, at what stage of the publishing process should writers bring publicists on board? 

Time can be a friend to writers or a cancer. The more advance notice you have to prep and lay groundwork, the better. For instance, to set up speaking engagements could mean you need to work six-nine months in advance. To contact book reviewers at major publications, you need to send advance review copies four months prior to publication date. Writers should consult publicists early and ask them what they can do for them, how much they’d charge, and what are their plans to make them a success. Then the author should figure out what they can do vs a publicist. For instance, authors don’t need to pay someone to do social media for them – they should do it themselves (but some may need coaching and consultation). Authors should use publicists for things that seem most foreign or difficult for them to do, or things that are time-consuming or where the success is based on media relationships and knowledge that authors just wouldn’t have.

Do you represent both published and self-published writers? Are there barriers to self-published writers getting reviews and coverage in mainstream media?

Oh yes, I represent a lot of self-published authors, accounting for maybe 40% of my client base. Most mainstream media is warming up to self-published books and the barriers to acceptance are the lowest they have been. But standard, old guard book reviewers at newspapers and magazines still hold prejudice against them. Online media and radio don’t care who the publisher is. Major TV looks and takes it into consideration but the medium is more personality-driven than publisher-driven. If a person with great credentials and/or a great story has something to say, that will dictate whether TV interviews the author.

blink1One of the books on your firm’s long list of best-selling campaigns was Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell. When that book came out, it seemed to be everywhere: TV, NPR, print media features. It was a very successful campaign for a high-concept nonfiction book. I’m wondering what an agency such as yours can do for literary fiction or genre writers who aren’t great fodder for the “ Good Morning America” circuit.

Yes, we have worked with all kinds of authors and genres over the years and there is room for good literary fiction. Certainly with online media and NPR or targeted radio interviews, one can get the word out. TV is not likely and some select print is possible.

I often hear from writers who have self-published first novels, put them out on Amazon, and sold nothing beyond a few copies to friends and relatives. Would you advise such writers to invest in a professional publicity campaign?

It depends on the author’s goal. People don’t just utilize a publicist to sell books. Writers need PR to brand themselves, build their media resume, get a positive message out there, come off as an expert or build a case for a literary agent to agree to represent them. Some books sell few copies because they aren’t promoted well. Others suffer from poor distribution. Some books are well-written but the cover is ugly and the price is worse. Some books are published that never should be – the topic is limited, the book is done poorly, oversaturation for the genre, or the author lacks qualifications for penning the book.

A great many publicity and marketing services have sprung up to service the boom in self-published books, and some of them seem sketchy to me, offering expensive services that are unlikely to prove effective. What questions should writers ask prospective service providers? What should they beware of?

Yes, this is an important area to focus on. First, look at the reputation of the people you are dealing with. How big are they? Too many promoters are one or two-people shops and although some can do a fine job, many are taxed, spending just as much time looking for business as they do in executing it. They have no depth or backup plan should they get sick, go on vacation, or hit a rut with the media. A bigger firm, such as Media Connect, has many resources and works as a team, rather than a solo act. Authors should ask who will they work with, how will things be communicated, how often will they receive an update, and what results are to be expected, though not guaranteed. Look at their Web site or social media – what tone do they give off? Do you like the person you are talking to? What success do they have for books like their book? Is the author being asked smart questions about them and their book or is the publicist just sweet-talking them and lavishing praise without even knowing much about them? I think if the publicist expresses a sincere passion for your work or your topic, that goes a long way in determining who to work with.

What are the biggest mistakes you see writers make in promoting their own work?

They don’t get started soon enough to plan and execute a PR campaign. They don’t invest in promotions, thinking a publisher will do everything. They put too much weight in one thing and don’t spread out their approach. Some spend unwisely on advertising, which rarely pays off for authors. They let fear, laziness, ego and being cheap get in the way of executing a comprehensive, timely and targeted campaign. They don’t fully understand that media begets media and that grass roots campaigns are good ways to establish media exposure. Authors are blinded when it comes to looking at their credentials or how they can be positioned to the media. They also don’t always work well with their publicists, such as not being available for calls, failing to provide things a publicist asks for, or forgetting to provide all of the information and resources necessary for a publicist to successfully promote them.

What are the most effective ways for writers, both published and self-published, to help their own books and careers?

Start by reading my blog, www.BookMarketingBuzzBlog.blogspot.com . Ok, shameless plug, but I think my 1100+ posts over three years on the topics that concern authors and book PR and marketing should help them a lot. Next, think of everything you do as a long-term event. Books may come and go but a writing career is constantly in flux. You build on everything you do. Don’t think something is too small to do to promote or market your book. Don’t let your ego convince you the book will sell itself without you doing everything possible to position it for success. Don’t focus on competing authors and get jealous or critical over what they do – worry about yourself and take care of business. Stop day dreaming and drawing up plans – get to work and day in and day out build up your social media platform and then find a way to collaborate with a publicist to help grow your brand and take you to the next level.

Thanks, Brian. Lots of great advice here–well worth a “shameless plug” or two!

In fact, I’ll follow that advice and your example by mentioning that my latest book,  A DANGEROUS FICTION (Viking Press), was called “required reading” by the New York Post, and “an absorbing mystery that keeps its secret until the very end” by NPR.  Though I am, admittedly, prejudiced, I’d be curious to read any book endorsed by that unlikely pair.  It’s a thriller set in the high-stakes NYC publishing world, and if you haven’t yet, I hope you’ll give it a read.

The Inside Scoop: A Publicist’s Take on Book Marketing

 

No one writes for his desk drawer. Books are a means of transmitting stories, ideas, history, experience, and emotion; and that transmission can only succeed when the books are read. But to be read they must first be discovered by readers, and therein lies the rub. Books need publicity the way lungs need oxygen, but with so many competing for attention, how can writers attain their moment in the sun?

Ben CameronRecently I had the chance to pick the brains of Ben Cameron, founder of the London-based Cameron Publicity and Marketing. (Rather a violent metaphor, when you think about it, but I promise no publicists were injured in the production of this post.) We talked about what sells books, how writers can help (and hurt) themselves, the role of independent publicists and what to watch out for, and much more. Have a read, then tell me what you think.

 

Barbara:  Tell me a bit about yourself and your company. What made you decide to focus on publicity and marketing for books?

Ben: I always loved books so when I finished university in the US and moved to the UK 20 years ago it was always my intention to work in publishing in some way. My first job in the industry was with a book wholesaler and it was there that I discovered marketing and publicity – I love the strategy and to creatively think my way around problems (marketing), and I’m a pretty decent talker (publicity). I was there for a few years before moving to a publishing company and then setting up my own agency.

 

Barbara:  Once, at a publishing party, I heard one well-known publisher admit that he really had no idea what sells books, while others at the table nodded. Do you know? Has anyone studied the question?

Ben: Great question!  There is no one answer. What we do is push books toward people and push people toward books and to a large degree we can influence sales. But for a big seller there is also an element of luck and magic that has to happen. The spark that made Harry Potter a phenomenon was awards, a marketing and publicity thing, but there was also a kindling of goodwill and great writing that needed to be there as well. Why did 50 Shades of Grey become a hit? I have no idea – erotica was certainly nothing new but it seems like its time had come and that book was in the right place at the right time. It was lucky, but a publicist did get it in the position that it needed to be in to become THAT book.

Barbara:  Can you give an example of a publicity/marketing campaign that elevated a previously unknown or little-known writer to the bestseller lists? What do you think made it so successful?

Thinking fast and slowBen: A good example is the book Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. It is a big publisher book (Penguin) but an interesting example of how to position a book for the market. This is a very academic psychology book that was promoted as popular science/business like Freakonomics or Malcolm Gladwell books. There were great little examples and excerpts from the book that were used for publicity to get it into the media in places that would not normally be interested in such and an in-depth and difficult to read book. A lot of what publicists do is to emphasize the more popular aspects of a book.

Barbara:  Effective publicity services don’t come cheap. Are they a good investment for all writers? If not, what sort of writer should consider hiring a publicity and/or marketing firm?

Ben: They aren’t cheap because it takes a huge amount of time and finesse to run an effective publicity campaign. A very academic book or a poetry book, for example, is not going to benefit much from a campaign – there just aren’t enough media outlets that will cover them – while something that can capture the imagination of a wide audience can pay back the cost many times over. Genre fiction is great for a shorter campaign, say 4-6 weeks, as that is enough time to reach its audience. Non-fiction often suits a longer campaign depending on the author and topic.  The important thing is to have a publicist explain why they think a certain style of campaign will suit the book and to feel comfortable with that explanation.

Barbara: Your company represents both published and self-published writers. Are there barriers to self-published writers getting reviews and coverage in mainstream media? If so, how do you overcome or sidestep them?

overcoming barriersBen: Yes, there are barriers but they are getting less significant every day. Getting reviews in the big newspapers is almost impossible still for obviously self-published books, but a lot of self-published books actually slip past the gatekeepers because they look as good as books from traditional publishers. To my mind feature articles and interviews are much more important than reviews anyway, and the journalists who do them care less about where a book came from than telling a good story. Most media understand that they need to include self-published books now but have difficulty knowing which books are worth consideration. That is where a good publicity pitch can go a long way.

Barbara: Has the consolidation of retail outlets (i.e. Amazon) affected your publicity and marketing strategy, and if so, how?

Ben: It isn’t good in many ways, but Amazon has been great for marketing. A customer can read about a book and instantly purchase it online. That is incredibly powerful for sales. Ebooks play into that as well – I myself will often read a review, buy the book immediately on my Kindle and start reading it within a minute. All that said, I personally love nothing more than going through the shelves in a good bookshop and placement of bookshops and bookshop events are helpful as well.

Barbara: What are the most effective ways for writers, both published and self-published, to help their own books and careers?

Ben: If you can afford a campaign it can really give you a long-term boost, but if not you can also buy-in the tools that you need to do the job yourself. You can pay only for a professionally written press release or a media mailing list or a listing on NetGalley (a website that showcases books to journalists, bloggers and reviewers) and it won’t cost an arm and a leg.

Barbara:  What are the biggest mistakes you see writers make in promoting their own work?

sales pitchBen: Not following up. Just sending out emails, review copies of books or press releases will get you almost nowhere. There needs to be a proper sales pitch made to the journalist explaining, in no uncertain terms, why the book is important. The author needs to be persistent and not get discouraged if they get no initial response. It takes a lot of time and effort and many people give up before they have really made the case for their book.

Barbara: A great many publicity and marketing services have sprung up to service the boom in self-published books, and some of them seem sketchy to me, offering expensive services that are unlikely to prove effective. What questions should writers ask prospective service providers? What should they beware of?

Ben: Like every part of self-publishing, the sharks are out there and there are plenty of poor services on offer. Do your research, talk to someone at the company or meet them in person and make sure that you are comfortable that they understand you and you book. Be wary of anyone who “guarantees” results – those results may well be on their own blog or podcast with very little audience, and publicity just doesn’t work in that way. Go for experience, a campaign designed specifically for you, a company that will regularly give you feedback and someone who “gets” your book.

 

Many thanks to Ben Cameron for sharing his time and expertise with IN COLD INK.  He can be reached on Facebook and on Twitter at @CameronPMtweets .

You might also enjoy these interviews with leading literary agent Gail Hochman, Simon & Schuster publisher Marysue Rucci, and publishing specialist Elizabeth Lyon. There are lots more to come, too, so do consider subscribing to IN COLD INK through links on the right.